Renewal Health Group is a Joint Commission Accredited comprehensive multi-level substance abuse treatment program management company offering services for adult men and women whose primary diagnosis is chemical dependency. We believe in treating the whole person, offering individual therapy and case management, psychoeducation, group therapy, equine therapy, yoga and mindfulness practice, and multiple holistic approaches, as well as offering traditional twelve-step values. The treatment process begins with the potential client interviewing with an experienced, registered recovery worker who assesses substance use history and past treatment history, medical and withdrawal history (the client’s symptoms, limitations, chronic pain, dietary requests or restrictions, special needs/limitations), psychiatric history and current safety concerns (co-occurring disorders, medications, hospitalizations, SI/HI, hallucinations, self-harm), legal history, current living arrangements/support systems, employment/education history, strengths, spiritual / religious needs, and treatment goals. This information is then reviewed by our Clinical Director, who will also speak with the client, assess the situation and make sure that we can help.

Renewal Healthcare is a Joint Commission Accredited comprehensive multi-level substance abuse treatment program management company offering services for adult men and women whose primary diagnosis is chemical dependency.

We believe in treating the whole person, offering individual therapy and case management, psychoeducation, group therapy, equine therapy,  yoga and mindfulness practice, and multiple holistic approaches, as well as offering  traditional twelve-step values.

The treatment process begins with the potential client  interviewing with an experienced, registered recovery worker who assesses substance use history and past treatment history, medical and withdrawal history (the client’s symptoms, limitations, chronic pain, dietary requests or restrictions, special needs/limitations), psychiatric history and current safety concerns (co-occurring disorders, medications, hospitalizations, SI/HI, hallucinations, self-harm), legal history, current living arrangements/support systems, employment/education history, strengths, spiritual / religious needs, and treatment goals.

This information is then reviewed by our Clinical Director, who will also speak with the client prior to making the decision to admit, based on our criteria of determining individual appropriateness for treatment in our programs.

Clients who enter treatment are scheduled to meet with our medical doctor within 24 hours of intake, and continue to be monitored and assessed with weekly medical visits for the entirety of their stay.

We have licensed registered and vocational nurses on staff to work closely with our medical team to provide the safest detox protocols possible. Clients are also scheduled each week to meet with our psychiatrist, and additionally on an as-needed basis to address their mental health needs.

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California Law Attacks Rehab Facilities

By Zachary Siegel and Allison McCabe 04/18/16

Despite a nationwide drug epidemic, California lawmakers have come up with draconian legislation that will result in the loss of thousands of treatment beds.

 

Earlier this year, a small handful of state legislators began what can only be described as an all-out assault on California’s behavioral and mental health care industry. They introduced four separate bills on February 19th that, each in its own technical way, take immediate aim at different facets of the continuum of substance abuse treatment. Though these bills serve only the self-interest of a few affluent, coastal communities, they are being pushed at a state level, which makes their potential impact widespread.

In the late ‘80s, the Fair Housing Act (FHA) was expanded to protect people from discrimination based on disabilities, including those who have substance use disorders. Then in 1990, these protections were further enforced under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Upon signing the act into law, President H.W. Bush called it a historic opportunity, signaling “the end to the unjustified segregation and exclusion of persons with disabilities from the mainstream of A

few affluent, coastal communities, they are being pushed at a state level, which makes their potential impact widespread.

segregation and exclusion of persons with disabilities from the mainstream of American life.”

Prince

Prince’s Tragic Death Underscores the National Opioid Epidemic

Like | May 4, 2016 | Blog |

The surprising and sudden death of musical superstar Prince bears to light the increasing problems and challenges our society faces with the onslaught of opioid-based pain medications. Prince, long considered a genius for his ground-breaking musical creativity that crossed so many boundaries, was found unconscious in his Paisley Park compound recently. Although many close to the icon suspect that sleep deprivation played a role in his death, the legendary performer, who was just 57, was found with a prescription opioid medication, leading to initial conclusions that these powerful pain killers also contributed to his untimely death. Prince had been treated a few days prior to his death for a potential overdose of pain medication, which had forced his plane to make an emergency landing, where he was then taken to a nearby hospital and released a few hours later

State of The Art Medicine

Andrea Barthwell, MD, FASAM

Director and Founder

Andrea Grubb Barthwell, MD, FASAM is an internationally renowned physician that has been a pioneer in the field of addiction medicine within the American Addiction Society of Medicine (ASAM) and a contributor to the field of alcoholism and addiction treatment. She is a past president of ASAM, was awarded Fellow status, and is certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Dr. Barthwell has been widely regarded by her peers as one of the “Best Doctors in America” in addiction medicine.

Dr. Barthwell’s career has been as diverse and successful as the patients for whom she advocates. Her career has been comprised of a unique balance of research and practice, and reflects her steadfast commitment to merging scientific inquiry with the human side of addiction: Dr. Barthwell has combined involvement in governmental policy with community-based work in health-care organizations, as well as serving on a number of editorial boards of scientific journals and widely publishing her own research.

Dr. Barthwell left clinical practice in 2002 when called to service as the Deputy Director for Demand Reduction, Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) by President George W. Bush. Following her service at ONDCP, Dr. Barthwell has worked to advance policies that strengthen medical care within addiction settings, conceived and developed a state-of-the-art holistic center for the treatment of alcoholism and drug dependence (Two Dreams with programs in Chicago, Illinois and Outer Banks, North Carolina), and re-opened her multispecialty group practice for the treatment of trauma, pain, and addiction in Chicago (Encounter Medical Group).

Dr. Barthwell is widely published and has served on a number of national advisory boards and committees, most notably the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), and the US Food and Drug Association (FDA) Drug Abuse Advisory Committee. Currently, she serves as a member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). She was appointed a clinical professorship for the School of Social Welfare at the State University of New York Stony Brook (SUNY). Additionally, Dr. Barthwell has been on the editorial boards of the Journal of International Drug, Alcohol and Tobacco Research (2010-present), the Journal of Global Drug Policy and Practice (2005-present), the American Journal on Addictions (1995-2002), the Journal of Maintenance in the Addictions (1997-2002), and the NIDA Editorial Advisory Board (1994-2002). She is the founder of “The Parents’ Academy”, a lecture series aimed at helping parents rear tobacco-, alcohol-, and drug-resistant children.

Dr. Barthwell is serves as the Medical Director for Encounter Medical Group PC and is the Founder and CEO of the Two Dreams facilities.

Dr. Dan

What we become is a product of our thought and a product of how we choose to respond to the social and political processes at work daily in our lives, from our very birth. The young child begins to learn what responses to give that will gain him or her attention, affection, or approval. The family is the cauldron of our being. Often what we see, we become. Aggression breeds aggression. Lies creates liars. Lack of regard for the child leads to the child have a lack of empathy for others. Poor familial boundaries leads to the child having poor boundaries in regards to others. How do some families evoke such violence upon their own children? We live in a society where children are committing the crimes of adults, where children are rapidly entering the world of adults but lack the growth and maturity to be fully responsible and understanding. Because of societal pressures, adults are abandoning their children, and children are thrown into a brutal quest for survival. They are exposed to the corrupt world of adults. Parental egoism and desire for self gratification become passed down to the children. Families shrouded in secrecy and denial are often the most destructive upon the minds of children. This becomes the breeding ground for the most vile of thought and action. These are the families who make love about control- ‘do as I say but not as I do, do this because I love you”. The child has no clear direction. They then begin to seek to break from their painful reality. They are fearful, possibly more fearful of living than of death. These children because of what they have seen and heard become persons as well who seek to use power, domination, and manipulation upon others. These are the children who become offenders. The mechanical world we exist within, where those who are not of the elite must struggle day by day leads to children being cast aside. The mechanical mentality has infected all institutions. Schools are no longer about learning but conformity, where students produce desired results for their teachers. We are creating frustrated families and frustrated children. This frustration has now built to the level of rage. This rage is destroying the minds of our children. This rage leads to violence and conflict. Is there a way out? Is there another way? It requires us to evaluate our responses. Life is suffering, all are presented with problems, this we cannot escape. But we can chose how to address our problems. If persons begin to lay aside the pain and hurt, and can build resiliency against the violence said to be ‘love’, if we can become survivors rather than victims, we stand a chance. If society and families can re-evaluate its values and principles, there is a chance. Many times a child is helped by having a helping person journey with them. We cannot do this alone, we must have others to journey with us. We need the restoration of a sense of community, of our inter-connectedness. There are no easy solutions. Sadly, the battle for the ‘soul’ of our children will mean some will be saved, and some will remain lost. But if even one child can be saved from the pit of self destruction, the efforts of time, compassion, and wisdom will be well worth it. In a world so rife with despair, it is so easy for us to fall into the same traps. Let us guard our minds, let us strive for social justice, and not give up hope that even in our small way, we can make a difference.
-Dr. Dan L. Edmunds

Neuroplasticity

“Neural plasticity” redirects here. For the journal, see Neural Plasticity (journal).

For the 2014 album by the band Cold Specks, see Neuroplasticity (Cold Specks album).
Neuroplasticity, also known as brain plasticity or neural plasticity, is an umbrella term that describes lasting change to the brain throughout an individual’s life course. The term gained prominence in the latter half of the 20th century, when new research[1][2] showed that many aspects of the brain can be altered (or are “plastic”) even into adulthood.[3] This notion is in contrast with the previous scientific consensus that the brain develops during a critical period in early childhood and then remains relatively unchanged (or “static”).[4]

Neuroplasticity can be observed at multiple scales, from microscopic changes in individual neurons to larger-scale changes such as cortical remapping in response to injury. However, cortical remapping is more extensive early in development.[5] Behavior, environmental stimuli, thought, and emotions may also cause neuroplastic change through activity-dependent plasticity, which has significant implications for healthy development, learning, memory, and recovery from brain damage.[5][6][7]

At the single cell level, synaptic plasticity refers to changes in the connections between neurons, whereas non-synaptic plasticity refers to changes in their intrinsic excitability.